Exercise and Prostate Cancer

The rising rate of prostate cancer necessitates developing better methods to prevent and treat prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death among U.S. men, according to the American Cancer Society. The country’s 3.3 million prostate cancer survivors account for 21 percent of all cancer survivors. There are many reasons why a cancer patient should stay as active as possible through cancer treatment and recovery. I

Exercise and Bladder, Thyroid and Prostate Cancers: The Impact of Staying Active

Part I: Bladder Cancer There are many reasons why a cancer patient should stay as active as possible through cancer treatment and recovery. I will begin by pointing out a few studies that show how exercise can benefit cancer patients. These studies demonstrate how exercise can reduce certain side effects from treatment, increase energy, decrease stress, and improve quality of life. In the last article of this series, I will suggest ways

Lymphedema: Personal Trainer Perspective

Cancer surgery and treatment often results in survivors suffering debilitating physical impairments. These can often be ameliorated by a good exercise program that has the added benefit of helping survivors to engage in those activities in which they participated prior to their diagnosis. This article addresses some of the physical side effects cancer survivors may face, including lymphedema and a series of safe and effective techniques to restore functional fitness for those with or at risk for lymphedema.

Osteoporosis

According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, 1 out of 2 women and 1 out of 4 men over 50 will have a wrist, hip, or spine fracture due to osteoporosis. If you have osteoporosis or osteopenia you should learn how to exercise properly and safely in order to decrease the risk the progression of this disease. Effective and safe exercise can improve your quality of life, overall health, and keep your osteoporosis under control.