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Launching Soon! Osteoporosis Fitness Specialist Course

I am excited to finally bring you the Osteoporosis Fitness Specialist program. It started about 3 years ago as a presentation on the MedFit Tour in Phoenix. It was then developed into a webinar, then short continuing education product, and now a full 10-hour course! It has been nicknamed Project B.O.N.E. for Beating Osteoporosis with Nutrition and Exercise.

It is a unique course in the fitness world because it is a total turn-key format. It starts in the first module with education on bone anatomy and physiology. It then delves into what osteoporosis and osteopenia are and how our bone mass naturally changes across time. It then goes into some of the mechanisms of how bone adapts to the stresses we put on it as well as the interrelationships between joints, bones and movements and how they can improve or decrease with movement or lack of it.

The second module goes into the role nutrients play on bone health. It is interesting that you can approach this from four different perspectives. First, you can attempt to integrate certain foods into your diet that help you obtain calcium, vitamin D, and other bone-building nutrients. Second, you can try to avoid foods that actually decrease calcium absorption and even the stores in your bone. These are termed calcium-robbing foods.

I have developed 13 short video segments that are entitled “EAT this, NOT that” to help guide people with substituting good food for a “bad food”, or one that potentially depletes calcium. Taking in the right nutrients is key because the exercises that strengthen bones are not able to do their “job” if the nutrients that can build bone are not available. Trying to change the way someone eats is one of the more difficult things in life. By making gradual changes and by substituting one food for another, the transitions become easier, and before you know it you are eating well!

The third module is about how exercise can change your bone health and why it works.  One common misconception is that weightlifting is going to stress your bones more than body weight movements that use ground forces. This is simply not true. The target spots and how to work them are combined into the SHoW ME pneumonic — which informs which body parts to focus on (Spine, Hips, and Wrists) and what exercise modalities to use, with Multiplanar activity and Eccentric contractions being the best for bone-building if the client can handle it. Another pneumonic is the SAFE exercises, which represents Strength, Agility, Flexibility and Equilibrium or balance.

The fourth module is on assessments. This is one of the keys to the innovation of this program. Not only does the assessment encompass personal traits, habits, demographic and activities of daily living, but it has a comprehensive physical assessment which is named the ABCEDEFF battery. The agility, balance (both static and dynamic), coordination, dexterity or deftness, endurance, force or strength in both upper and lower regions, and flexibility in both upper and lower regions are part of this assessment program. The tests are simple to perform and the individual will fall into one of four categories, with some having male and female standards separately. The proper way to perform the assessment tests are demonstrated in videos.

The fifth module is putting it all together meaning you’re using: a) the results of your assessment and b) the client’s intake information, which includes their c) needs, limitations and preferences to combine it into a comprehensive, highly-personalized and effective. Clientas will likely not be at the same level for all the variables tested, so you may have a client who is strong but inflexible or a client that is flexible but weak. You address the weak spots and monitor progress easily.

Why is it so effective? Because the assessment will categorize the client one of four levels. Each exercise has four levels for proper progression or regression. The client is getting the right exercise for them depending on their skills, bone density and any limitations. Exercises are similar in each of the three workout venues — a gym, a park, and at home — but vary with the equipment available and surroundings. Each of these venues has pros and cons and in the current age of COVID, it is important to have alternatives to turn to.

The final module addresses some business aspects. Marketing and promoting your skills and knowledge are what keeps you in business. There must be a balance between the training skills and knowledge as well as how to manage the logistics and getting the word out.

I believe this program will set a new standard in training programs and how to carefully train a client with the knowledge gained from an assessment and thorough intake questionnaire. The disease of osteoporosis is only going to get bigger. With 54 million Americans already with low bone density, the numbers are already huge!

Join the waitlist to be notified when the course is live on MedFit Classroom. You’ll get an exclusive 50% discount when it launches!


Dr. Mark P. Kelly has been involved with the health and fitness field for more than 30 years. He has been a research scientist for universities and many infomercial projects. He has spoken nationally and internationally on a wide variety of topics and currently speaks on the use of exercise for clinical purposes and exercise’s impact on the brain. Mark is a teacher in colleges and universities in Orange County, CA., where Principle-Centered Health- Corporate Wellness & Safety operates.

hand xray bones

7 Simple Habits You Didn’t Know Could Affect Your Bones

Do you know that the things you do every day can affect your bones? Sadly, ‘harmless’ things that are a part of our routine can actually hurt our bones in the long run. For example, we carry a lot of weight, we lead a sedentary life, we eat all the wrong things; and with the passage of time, we develop joint aches and bone ailments.

By eliminating these simple habits from our lifestyles, we can avoid getting osteoarthritis and protect our health.  Continue reading to find out more.

1.     Sedentary Lifestyle

We wake up, go to work, and sit in front of a computer screen all day. People who spend a lot of time sitting have at a higher risk of suffering from osteoporosis. Practicing a sedentary lifestyle is common for people who work in an office. There is not much time to move around.

Walking, dancing and running can be very helpful in strengthening your bones. So give your bones the exercise they need.

2.     Lack of Sleep

Rest is essential for everyone. The thing you should know about your body is that it goes through a constant cycle of detoxifying and cleansing. This process starts with the lymphatic system and continues to your liver. They slowly re-balance and restore the essential functions of your body. And for this process to occur, your body needs to be submerged in deep rest.

Research shows that lack of sleep damages the health of your bones as well. It also reduces the bone marrow and makes materialization difficult, which can lead to osteoporosis in the future.

3.     Be Careful with High Heels and Bags

Women have a lot of habits that damage their bones over time. We all drool over our high heels and spend a considerable portion of our paycheck buying the perfect pair. What we don’t know that wearing high heels frequently have a terrible impact on our posture. And thereby, affect the bones in our shins, feet, and back. After a long day of wearing heels, intense pain and fatigue sets in. And in the years that come by, you could suffer from serious problems. So instead of choosing high heels, go for the medium ones.

Another thing that is affecting your posture is those heavy bags. Without even realizing it, some women carry 10 kilos worth of stuff in their tote and shoulder bags. Carrying so much weight, unfortunately, puts a great deal of stress on your shoulders and spine. Not to forget, it causes pain and discomfort.

4.     Smoking

We have all heard the warning that smoking is bad for health. What most people don’t know is that it is even worse for your bones. Studies prove that people who use tobacco frequently have lower levels of bone density. Smokers are at a higher risk for fractures than non-smokers. Smoking produces free radicals which kill the cells that build bones (i.e., osteoblasts). If you have already had a fractured bone, smoking damages your blood vessels, which result in the slow healing process.

So throw away that pack of cigarettes, you don’t need them, and neither do your bones.

5.     High Salt Consumption

There is definitely a relationship between lower bone density and high salt intake.

We all know salt is bad for our skeletal system as it leeches calcium from our bones. The junk food that we like to munch on time and again is also causing harm to our joints and ligaments. Table salt consists of chloride and sodium. If we consume too much of it, it promotes metabolic acidosis. And that contributes towards the loss of bone density in the long run.

6.     Constant Coffee and Soda Consumption

Your day isn’t complete without a cup of coffee. Caffeine is necessary to wake up and give our day the much-needed boost. Coffee contains Methylated xanthine, which increases the amount of calcium release through urine. And over time, the minerals from your bones are affected, resulting in brittle bones.

One or two cups of coffee a day is fine. But, if you exceed that number, your bones will suffer the consequences.

Another drink that affects the health of your bones is soda, especially cola drinks. Sodas have a high amount of phosphoric acids in them, which reduce the consumption of calcium. So it’s better to avoid carbonated beverages so they can’t cause problems later.

7.     Sugary or Processed Foods

Packaged and highly-processed foods have low nutrients and high sodium and sugar level. Processed food contains food additives and synthetic chemicals that are very bad for your health. Packaged foods often include hydrogenated oils that are very damaging to your bones. In addition to that, your bones will pay a hefty price if you indulge yourself in a lot of sugary snacks. Not only sugar is inflammatory; it also leads to the blood-sugar imbalances that damage your bones.

Remember, if you cut back on these 7 habits, your bones will be stronger, and you will avoid a lot of bone-related problems in your later life. Not to forget, watch your calcium and vitamin D intake so your bones could be healthy!


Zyana Morris is a passionate blogger who loves to write on trending health, fitness and lifestyle topics. She is a featured author at HealthableUplifting FamiliesInscriber MagHello Mamas and few others. Her favorite quote “It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop”. You can follow her through Facebook and Twitter.

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Osteoporosis Prevention Diet

Osteoporosis Prevention Diet? EEK! One more thing to worry about? Sounds like more bad news but it’s not. True, our bodies can lose up to 40% of their bone mass in the 10 years following menopause. And true, if we don’t do something we could easily end up with osteoporosis. But also true, the fix for this is both easy and delicious.

Human Osteoporosis

Does Low Bone Mass Mean Osteoporosis?

Nearly 30 years ago when I was in school, I wrote an exercise physiology paper on exercise and osteoporosis.

At that time there wasn’t much research available. But even then, the studies I found on tennis players, astronauts, and bed rest pointed in the direction that weight-bearing exercise could help maintain the bone density you have and even promote bone growth. I was intrigued. I’ve followed the research over the years and even created an osteoporosis exercise program.

In working with my clients, I often hear the question, “What’s the difference between osteoporosis and low bone mass (osteopenia)? And what can I do about it?”

Well to answer these questions, I have to start at the beginning.

Osteoporosis is a disease, which, over time, causes bones to become thinner, more porous and less able to support the body. Bones can become so thin that they break during normal, everyday activity. Osteoporosis is a major health threat. 54 Million are at risk, nearly 80% are women.

Postmenopausal women are particularly at risk because they stop producing estrogen, a major protector of bone mass.

As we age some bone loss is inevitable. Women age 65 or men age 70 should get a bone mineral density test. If you have a family history of osteoporosis or other risk factors, you may need a BMD much earlier.

The test is completely painless, non-invasive and takes only a few minutes. It compares your bone mineral density to that of an average healthy young person. Your results are called your T score. The difference between your score and the average young person’s T-score is called a standard deviation. (SD)

Here is how to interpret your T score:

  • Between +1 and –1: normal bone density.
  • Between -1 and -2.5: low bone density (osteopenia).
  • T-score of -2.5 or lower: osteoporosis.

Until recently it was thought that if you had low bone mass (osteopenia) you were well on your way to getting osteoporosis. But it’s now known even at this stage bone loss can be slowed down, stopped and even reversed. You and your doctor will have a number of options depending upon your particular condition.

Many MDs like to start with a calcium and vitamin D rich diet coupled with weight-bearing exercise. For many of us, that’s all we need. Others will require medication and there are many bone-building medications available.

Remember it’s never too early to start taking care of your bones. The more bone density you have as a young person the less likely to end up with osteoporosis later in life.

EASE IN, BECOME MOBILE, GET STRONG, LIVE LONG!  May is Osteoporosis Prevention Month! It’s Never Too Late To Take Care Of Your Bones!


Mirabai Holland MFA, EP-C, CHC is one of the foremost authorities in the health and fitness industry. Her customer top rated exercise videos for Health issues like Osteoporosis, Arthritis, Heart Disease, Diabetes & more are available mirabaiholland.com. Join her NEW Online Workout Club at movingfreewithmirabai.com. Mirabai offers one-on-on Health Coaching on Skype or Phone. Contact her at askmirabai@movingfree.com.

tuberow

Best Exercises to Prevent Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a disease that affects our bone system due to a decrease in bone mass, density and an increase in the space between the bones. As a result, one’s bones become brittle and suspect to breaking. There are two types of osteoporosis: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is generally a result of the aging process and a decrease in hormones such as estrogen and progesterone. These hormones help regulate how fast bone is lost. Type 2 is a result of medications or other health issues that interfere with bone reformation. Thankfully, both types are treatable!

Most Common Areas Affected: Osteoporosis is generally found in the neck of the thigh and lower back.  A lot occurs in these areas, so, a decrease in the strength of the bone there is not a good thing.

Nutrition: Since nutrition plays a factor in everything we do, it is important to mention it for those with osteoporosis. The three things to focus on the most are: an increase in calcium, and a stoppage of alcohol intake and smoking.

Exercises: Research shows that it takes about six months of consistent exercise at somewhat high intensities to produce enough bone mass change. With that being said, it is important to use proper exercises in a progressive fashion and make them specific to you.  Exercises should focus on the following areas of the body as they stress the overall bone structure: core, hips, thighs, back and arms. Here are my top six exercises to start your 6-month program:

Planks: 1-3 sets of 8-20 reps
planks

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supine Bridges: 1-3 sets of 8-20 reps
supinebridge

Prone Cobras:
1-3 sets of 8-20 reps
cobra

Squats:
1-3 sets, 8-20 reps
squats

Standing Tube Row:
1-3 sets, 8-20 reps
tuberow

Single leg balance:
1-3 sets, 8-20 reps
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Conclusion

While osteoporosis can be a life threatening disease, it can be managed through exercise. Most people who include daily exercise are able to ward off further damage to their body and are able to do their normal daily activities of life. Performing the six exercises listed and then progressing to more challenging ones will keep a person with osteoporosis healthy!


Maurice D. Williams is a personal trainer and owner of Move Well Fitness in Bethesda, MD. With almost two deciades in the industry, he’s worked with a wide range of clients, including those with health challenges like diabetes, osteoporosis, multiple sclerosis, hypertension, coronary artery disease, lower back pain, pulmonary issues, and pregnancy. Maurice is also a fitness educator with Move Well Fit Academy and NASM.  

Senior Man On Cross Trainer In Gym

Where to Begin When You Are Working Out With a Health Condition

The gym can be a confusing place especially for individuals with health concerns. Many times, these clients are trying to navigate their workouts by themselves because they are unsure of the appropriate questions that they need to ask.

First of all, there are two different types of trainers. There are trainers who have a four year degree and certifications. These trainers are sometimes called Fitness Specialists and have had many hours of study related to a wide variety of diseases and injuries. They are used to modifying exercises and programs based on any specific condition you may have. Fitness Specialists are usually found in a medically based fitness facility affiliated with a hospital. Please note that some Fitness Specialist’s will specialize in a certain area. Some work with individuals with diseases and disabilities and some don’t.

Personal Trainer, Gym, Pull Down Machine, Exercising, AssistanceWhen you finally narrow down who you might like to hire you will want to ask some questions. Please don’t be afraid to ask these questions as they will help you to decide which trainer is right for you. It is also recommended that you observe Fitness Specialists training clients.

First you want to make sure that the trainer has had experience with your condition. If not, they should be willing to research it and or speak with your doctor with your permission. There are exercise guidelines that all Fitness Specialists should follow when working with clients who have health conditions.

You will also want to ask about the trainers background. It is alright to ask about education, certifications, and years of experience. You also want to hire someone who is patient with you. This is extremely important as you figure out which exercises work best for your body. I would also like to add that you need to be patient with yourself as well. Try to relax and enjoy your training session.

Asking the questions from above help to keep you feeling confident. Exercise can seem frustrating in the beginning but you have to keep a positive mindset. In the beginning, set small goals and do the best you can during each training session.


Robyn Caruso is the Founder of The Stress Management Institute for Health and Fitness Professionals. She has 15 years of experience in medical based fitness.