Hide

Error message here!

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Error message here!

Back to log-in

Close
doctor-health

When It Comes to Health, There Is No One Size Fits All

Have you ever wondered why a particular diet, workout routine or cleanse offers remarkable results for some people, but not others?

It’s because of bio-individuality and Metabolic Chaos®.

When it comes to health, there is no one size fits all!  Each person is unique on a cellular and metabolic level.  They have their own health strengths and weaknesses, or vital voids as Reed Davis, the founder of Functional Diagnostic Nutrition® calls them.  So, instead of treating symptoms, tests and/or assessment results, the key is to assess the specific needs of each person.

Functional lab testing is the best way to analyze a person’s specific needs on a deeper level.  The comprehensive data obtained through lab testing can be used to inform and guide a health-building program, to get real results that last a lifetime.

Reed Davis, the founder of Functional Diagnostic Nutrition®, worked for over a decade as a certified nutritional therapist and case manager perfecting lab testing and resources.  And now for over 10 years, he has been sharing his knowledge through the FDN course with a mission to empower as many people as possible to help as many people as possible to get well and stay well naturally.

After helping hundreds of clients, Reed discovered that while each was unique in their health challenges, they also had much in common – H.I.D.D.E.N. stressors.

Through clinical work, Reed identified 5 foundational lab tests essential for in-depth insights in order to uncover a client’s H.I.D.D.E.N. stressors and reveal their true healing opportunities to build their health.

Having access to lab testing, knowing how to properly interpret the results and use the data to guide a health building protocol is what makes certified Functional Diagnostic Nutrition® Practitioners so successful in getting their clients real results.

Like you, most of our FDN practitioners started off as health coaches, personal trainers, nutritionists, nurses, homemakers or were in non-health related fields and changed their career because they were inspired by their personal health journey.

No matter what their prior profession was, all of them have these 3 things in common:

  • A strong desire to help others on a deeper level
  • Willingness to walk the talk and empower others to do the same
  • A feeling as if they were missing some very important pieces to the health puzzle.

FDN’s complete methodology has empowered over 3,000 trainees in over 50 different countries to help people get well and stay well naturally.

Join FDN founder Reed Davis for a free upcoming webinar…


Reed Davis is a Nutritional Therapist and has been the Health Director and Case Manager at a wellness clinic San Diego for over 15 years; he is the Founder of the Functional Diagnostic Nutrition® Certification Course.

Trainer helping senior woman exercising with a bosu balance

Stroke Survivors Worldwide Desperately Seeking Great Care. Don’t Be a Deceiving Professional

15 Million People Suffer Stroke Each Year. There is a huge “real” need for stroke survivors to have continued physical therapy after their insurance has covered their (usually very limited) physical therapy sessions.

It’s an important time for fitness professionals to step up and gain stronger knowledge in physical rehabilitation with stroke survivors. This need is worldwide!

I know this because I have helped survivors worldwide and heard their stories of struggle. I’ve personally heard their human desire to get their bodies back to movements for everyday life. This includes things like walking, arm and hand function, balance, cognitive skills, stability, driving and much more!! Hundreds of thousands of survivors are desperately seeking proper care and guidance.

I have been asked by stroke survivors and caregivers worldwide for help. After I published my first book in 2017, The Stroke of an Artist, The Journey of a Stroke Survivor and a Fitness Trainer, I began being contacted from all over the world for help. I wanted so badly to help them all.

I also received calls and messages from personal trainers who had a survivor client. I was surprised at how some reacted. For example, one trainer, after spending an hour sharing knowledge and telling him to seek out more education beyond the one-day certification he had, responded with “So basically…” — he tried to sum up in one sentence how to train a survivor. And he had it all covered. I thought, wow, that survivor’s recovery is determined by this trainer’s ego and lack of listening skills. Most trainers I spoke with wanted a quick answer to full-body stroke recovery. They did not want to take the time needed to extend their knowledge.

I decided to begin a Stroke Recovery support group via private Facebook group page. There are almost 3000 members. It breaks my heart, but it keeps me constantly motivated to do what I can to help them and try my best to educate fitness professionals.

It is wonderful to have such a gathering from all over the world in this stroke recovery support group. It is serial and fascinating.  Everyone is so kind and supportive in the group to one another. They encourage and try to help each other so much.

Look at all the different countries our members have gathered together from: Israel, Europe, Switzerland, Australia, Canada, UK, Africa, Great Britain, Vietnam, New Zealand, Scotland, Philippines, Fiji, Ireland, Indonesia, Micronesia, Mumbai, Maharashtra, Turkey, and many States in the United States.

I know how real the urgent need is for fitness professionals to gain knowledge to help survivors get their lives back.

I decided to help get the survivors and caregivers educated since finding the professionals to help them sucked.

I then wrote my book, Stroke Recovery, What Now? When Physical Therapy Ends But Your Recovery Continues

Around this time Lisa Dougherty with the MedFit Education Foundation contacted me to be on the Education Advisory Board and write a Stroke Recovery and Exercise CEC course. I was very excited to have a platform to reach professionals to educate them to bring needed care to stroke survivors.

Fitness professionals and physical therapists must continue their education way beyond the basics of getting their original certification, license and credentials.

Hundreds of survivors have shared with me their struggles to find great care. The stories blow my mind and frustrated me tremendously.

Here is one recent story.

A 54-year-old female survivor, who lives 3 hours away from me, was so excited and filled with hope again after we met in my support group and reading my books and watching my videos. She began to get hand movement back and decided to go find a physical therapist again. She searched, asked questions and found someone who appeared and sounded like they had the knowledge and expertise to help her. She was excited, she sent me a private message and told me what the therapist said. It sounded good. This therapist spoke the neuro words.

This survivor shared in the support group how excited she was and tagged me, thanking me for helping her feel hope again. Everyone was proud of her and encouraging her. I was thrilled.

A few days ago, she sent me a message that after her 5th session with this therapist, the therapist told her that she’d never worked with a stroke survivor before and can’t help her.  She said she had gained more knowledge and recovery from me than 5 sessions with this therapist.

This upsets me so much. She deserves great care and real help. All stroke survivors do. Now she has wasted 5 insurance paid PT session and 5 co-pays. That is not okay!

I have hundreds of stories like this and some are worse.

So, to all fitness professionals and therapists…

Please don’t fake your knowledge and experience to gain a client. Don’t just talk the talk. Put the time and effort into continuing your education. Have integrity, a heart of passion and honesty in your work.

This can mean someone may walk or not walk again.

This can mean someone can hold a fork in their hand again or not.

This may mean someone can go back to work or never again.

And so much more!

In the case of the Survivor who was an artist in my first book, it meant he would paint again or not. He did paint again.

Survivors are encouraged and try to believe, never give up and don’t quit. But they need to have educated professionals they can trust to join their personal stroke recovery team.

And the fabulous 54-year-old stroke Survivor refers to me as “God’s Stroke Angel”. That makes my heart feel warm and fuzzy. ❤

I will be presenting a 4-hour “Stroke Recovery and Exercise” workshop on Thursday, February 6 from 7:30-11:30am at the Medical Fitness Tour in Irvine, CA (at UC Irvine campus). Find details at medicalfitnesstour.org/socal. Come gain a lot of knowledge to help stroke survivors gain the stroke recovery the deserve.

Fitness Specialist and Educator Tracy Markley is the Founder of Tracy’s Personal Training, Pilates & Yoga in Florence, OR. Tracy has over 2 decades experience in the fitness industry; she holds numerous specialty certifications, including many for those with medical conditions & chronic disease. She’s also studied the Brain and the neurological system, and has had great success working with seniors and special populations in stroke recovery, neurological challenges and fall prevention. Tracy also serves on the MedFit Education Foundation Advisory Board

She’s authored 3 books: “The Stroke of An Artist, The Journey of A Fitness Trainer and A Stroke Survivor” and “Tipping Toward Balance, A Fitness Trainer’s Guide to Stability and Walking” and “Stroke Recovery, What Now? When Physical Therapy Ends, But Your Recovery Continues”. Her books bring hope, knowledge and exercises to those in need, as well as sharing her knowledge and experience with other fitness professionals.

Friends With Kettlebells On Exercise Mat In Gym

VO2 Max: Connecting the Dots Between Fitness Metrics and Healthcare

Cardiovascular fitness has become universally acknowledged as a major determinant of health outcomes.  Yet relatively few fitness facilities help their members quantify fitness in the way that is recognized by the research and medical communities as being scientifically valid.  As the fitness and medical communities become more connected and increasingly partner with one another, a common language about cardiovascular fitness should be used. 

blood pressure cuff

Be a Blood Pressure Hero!

Did you know as a health-fitness professional you can have a positive effect on a client’s health, longevity, and brain function by simply helping them prevent and manage hypertension? The good news is that it is easy- just get them to exercise regularly. The influence of exercise on blood pressure is significant, and for most clients promoting healthy blood pressure is as easy as learning how to assess BP, prescribe regular exercise, and re-assess BP.  Almost every client with elevated BP will see results with regular exercise… so why not be the BP hero?

To be a BP hero, it is important to be educated in the anatomy of BP, how BP works, how to assess BP, BP disease exercise warning signs, and what has a positive effect on maintaining a good BP or lowering an elevated BP. This article gives you a snapshot insight into the fascinating world of blood pressure and exercise.

The body delivers vital oxygen and nutrients and removes waste and metabolic by-products through the combined effort of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, referred to in combination as the cardiorespiratory (CR) system. The lungs in the pulmonary system are of particular interest as the closed loop vascular system passes through the lungs to pick up oxygen and dispose of carbon dioxide. The success of this closed-loop system relies heavily on a delicate balance to provide effective distribution of blood to virtually all organs and cells in the body.

The proper function of the cardiorespiratory system, and the ability of blood to continuously loop though the system, depends on maintaining the proper pressure in the vessels and organs of the cardiorespiratory system. The pressure is primarily controlled by the vascular system. The pressure maintained in the CR system is measured and monitored by blood pressure.

Blood Pressure is defined as the pressure/force exerted on the arterial walls with each heart beat. (Cleveland Clinic 2019) Blood pressure can be measured directly by a catheter in the artery, or indirectly with a blood pressure cuff and sphygmomanometer. Two pressures in the arteries are measured to determine blood pressure:

  • Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP): represents the highest pressure (against the artery walls) in the artery occurring during ventricular systole, or ventricular contraction, and ventricular blood ejection.
  • Diastolic Blood Pressure (DBP): represents the lowest pressure (against the artery walls) in the artery occurring during ventricular diastole, or ventricular relaxation, which allows the heart to refill.

Blood pressure is the amount of force (hydrostatic pressure) that pushes the blood through the vascular system. Pressure drops gradually as the large arterial vessels branch resulting in lower venous pressures (compared to artery pressure) as the blood progresses through the closed loop system. Blood pressure and associated measures are commonly expressed in millimeters of mercury or “mmHg.”

BP is expressed by ventricular systole over ventricular diastole, for example 120/80. Blood pressure does not remain constant and varies throughout the day or over time in the aging process depending on many factors including exercise, stress, body position, medication, cardiovascular condition, respiratory health, proper hydration, and age.

Did You Know?

Blood Pressure depends primarily on body size.

So, children and young adolescents have much lower blood pressures than adults. (Kenney 2019)

Current Guidelines for BP Classification and Management

American Heart Association 2019 (www.heart.org)

Systolic BP
Diastolic BP
Classification
*Recommendations
<120 and <80 Normal Healthy lifestyle choices and yearly checks.
120-129 and <80 Elevated Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle changes and reassessed in 3-6 months
130-139 or 80-89 High Blood Pressure Stage I 10 year heart disease and stroke risk assessment. If less than 10% risk, lifestyle changes and reassessed in 3-6 months. If higher after reassessment, lifestyle changes and medication with monthly follow-ups until BP is controlled.
≥140 or ≥90 High Blood Pressure Stage II Lifestyle changes and 2 different classes of medicine, with monthly follow-ups until BP is controlled.
*Individual recommendations need to come from health care provider.

Source: American Heart Association’s Journal Hypertension published November 13, 2017.

Hypertension is defined as:

“Having a resting systolic blood pressure (SBP) >140 mmHg and/or a resting diastolic blood pressure (DBP) >90 mmHg, confirmed by a minimum of two measures taken on at least two separate days, or taking antihypertensive medication for the purpose of blood pressure control.” (ACSM 2018)

This chronic medical condition is called the “silent killer” because there are typically no symptoms. Learning how to assess BP for your client can put you forefront in the fight to detect and fight this deadly chronic disease.  Elevated blood pressure can increase the risk for coronary artery disease, stroke, heart attack, kidney disease, peripheral artery disease, and heart failure. There are both genetic and lifestyle factors that can affect the development of hypertension.

A client with hypertension should engage in regular exercise after their blood pressure is effectively controlled. Exercise to control and manage high blood pressure should only be initiated after the client has seen their health care professional and is under medical supervision and treatment.  Systolic blood pressure can increase significantly during exercise, so the client coming to you with high blood pressure should not exercise without medical clearance.

Did You Know?

Hypertension causes the heart to work harder than normal at rest and with activity because it must pump blood from the left ventricle against a greater resistance in the arteries. (Kenney 2019)

The American Heart Association updated guidelines recommend treatment options including lifestyle changes and blood pressure lowering medications. The lifestyle modifications for those with hypertension can lower systolic approximately 4 to 11 mmHg with the largest impact from diet and exercise. (Whelton et al., 2017)

It is well documented in research that even light-moderate exercise can help control and lower blood pressure if you have hypertension. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a minimum threshold of 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity physical activity for health and quality of life. This threshold of physical activity plays an important role in cardiorespiratory health, longevity, brain health, muscle/bone health, balance and fall prevention, and function to name a few. Maintaining physical activity/exercise is recommended for prevention and control of virtually all chronic diseases.

In most people, hypertension responds very well to using physical activity/exercise as an adjunct therapy. Starting regular exercise typically helps you control hypertension with lower medication doses. As a health-fitness professional, it is very rewarding to see a client reduce or eliminate blood pressure medication through a regular exercise program.

To learn more, register for the upcoming webinar on the topic, Be a Blood Pressure Hero. Or take a continuing education course about blood pressure and exercise. Knowledge is power and will help you to become a BP hero!


Compiled by June M. Chewning BS, MA. The information from this article is from “Blood Pressure, Hypertension, and Exercise.”  A continuing education course offered by FLS.

June M. Chewning BS, MA has been in the fitness industry since 1978 serving as a physical education teacher, group fitness instructor, personal trainer, gym owner, master trainer, adjunct college professor, curriculum formatter and developer, and education consultant. She is the education specialist at Fitness Learning Systems, a continuing education company.

References

  1. Chewning, J and Schmidt-McNulty T. (2019) Blood Pressure, Hypertension, and Exercise. Fitness Learning Systems. nafconliine.com
  2. American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). (2018) ACSM’ Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription. 10th Wolters Kluwer.
  3. Kenney WL, Wilmore JH, Costill DL. (2015) Physiology of Sport and Exercise. 6th Human Kinetics.
  4. Whelton PK, Carey RM, Aronow WS, Casey DE Jr, Collins KJ, Dennison-Himmelfarb C, DePalma SM, Gidding S, Jamerson KA, Jones DW, MacLaughlin EJ, Muntner P, Ovbiagele B, Smith SC Jr, Spencer CC, Stafford RS, Taler SJ, Thomas RJ, Williams KA Sr, Williamson JD, and Wright JT Jr. (2017) ACC/AHA/AAPA/ABC/ACPM/AGS/APhA/ASH/ASPC/NMA/PCNA guideline for the prevention, detection, evaluation, and management of high blood pressure in adults: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines. Hypertension. doi: 10.1161/HYP.0000000000000065
brain

Neuroplasticity and the Aging Brain

One of the greatest concerns for the aging population is cognitive decline which leads to loss of independence as well as an extreme burden on the caretakers.  Individuals worldwide are fearful of being diagnosed with any of the various cognitive issues: Dementia, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and other forms of cognitive debilities.  In 2015 there was an estimated 47 million people living with dementia and this number is expected to triple by 2050.  In 2014, the Alzheimer’s Association reported that they believe there is sufficient evidence to support the link between several modifiable risk factors and a reduced risk for cognitive decline and sufficient evidence to suggest that some modifiable risk factors may be associated with reduced risk of dementia. Specifically, that regular physical activity and management of cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes, obesity, smoking, and hypertension) reduce the risk of cognitive decline and may reduce the risk of dementia. The Association also believes there is sufficiently strong evidence to conclude that a healthy diet and lifelong learning/cognitive training may also reduce the risk of cognitive decline.

Positive association between aerobic exercise or CV fitness and executive functions is highly consistent but cannot determine causality.  Aerobic exercise (AE) has shown moderate to medium sized effects on executive function and memory. Resistance Training (RT) has improved executive function and memory. Combined AE and RT has the biggest (potentially synergistic) effect. It has been proposed that the physical and cognitive exercise might interact to induce larger functional benefits.  Larger benefits on cognitive test performance were noted for combined physical and cognitive activity than for each activity alone.  “Claims promoting brain games are frequently exaggerated and at times misleading. … To date, there is little evidence that playing brain games improves underlying broad cognitive abilities, or that it enables one to better navigate a complex realm of everyday life (Consensus statement, 2014).

Neuroplasticity is the brain’s ability to reorganize and rebuild itself by forming new neural connections. The more neural pathways you have, the more resilient your brain is. Neurogenesis is the process of creating new neurons (brain cells).

Contrary to popular belief, neurogenesis continuously occurs in the adult brain under the right conditions such as with exercise.  Substantial benefits on cognitive test performance were noted for combined physical and cognitive activity than for each activity alone. It was also noted that the physical and cognitive exercise together might interact to induce larger functional benefits.  “We assume, that physical exercise increases the potential for neurogenesis and synaptogenesis while cognitive exercise guides it to induce positive plastic change” (Bamidis, 2014).  To maximize cognitive improvement, combine physical exercise with cognitive challenges in a rich sensorimotor environment that includes social interaction and a heaping dose of fun.

Brain health is becoming extremely important as individuals live longer.  Today there is much more information available on how to train the aging brain.

Some great resources are:


Dianne McCaughey Ph.D. is an award winning fitness specialist with more than 35 years experience in personal training, group exercise, coaching, and post-rehabilitation. She is a master trainer for multiple companies and practices and teaches optimal wellness emphasizing the mind, body and spirit. She works with special populations and focuses on posture, gait, balance and corrective exercise programs for better function and health.

Cody Sipe, PhD, has an extensive background in the fitness industry with 20 years of experience as a personal trainer, fitness instructor, program director, exercise physiologist and club owner. He is currently an Associate Professor and Director of Clinical Research in the physical therapy program at Harding University. He is the co-founder and vice president of the Functional Aging Institute (FAI).

 

Moshe_Feldenkrais_Demonstrates_Functional_Integration

Felden-WHAT?

Feldenkrais. It is a method of movement re-education, named after the man who developed it, Moshe Feldenkrais.

Usually students come to me because they are experiencing some kind of limitation, something that is interfering with their daily life or obstructing progress or performance. My job is to figure out how they are moving, how that relates to the problem they are experiencing, and how they could move differently enough so that the problem can’t continue.

Moshe Feldenkrais Demonstrates Functional Integration.

Most of us are unaware of how we move. We pay attention to where we’re going or what we are doing, not to how we move. For example, think about how you stand up from sitting. How do you do it? What happens? What moves when?

It often seems as if people have gotten stuck doing a movement or holding themselves, unconsciously, in a certain way. For instance, if you injure your leg, you change how you walk and you begin to limp. The limp may be appropriate immediately after an injury, but it can last much longer than the injury. If it continues longer than it’s needed, it can lead directly to pain, stiffness, and other problems. But that’s just one example; you can limp with your shoulder, your neck, or your back. Indeed, you don’t have to injure yourself to develop this kind of movement. You can acquire a similar habit playing a musical instrument, repeating work movements day in and day out, playing certain sports, and so on. The key is that you develop a movement pattern you get stuck with, a pattern that underlies every movement and interferes with any activity that runs counter to it.

Feldenkrais isn’t about curing or fixing people. It isn’t a medical treatment, it’s an educational approach. It’s about helping people get control back into their lives by understanding why they feel the way they do and by learning how to move differently so that they don’t have to keep feeling that way. Even when people have an organic problem or disease, I can often help them deal with how they respond to the problem. For instance, when I work with people who have arthritis, my job isn’t to get rid of the disease. In this case, my job is to help them move so that they don’t stress the affected joints and so that they can find more comfortable, safer, ways to do what they want to do. Same thing applies to disc problems—even when there is a structural problem—the question is how can the person move in a better way, so that they increase their comfort and avoid or minimize future problems.

Want to learn more?

Register for an upcoming webinar on this topic with Dr. Mark Erickson, Body Awareness Training: The Missing Link in the Exercise Continuum. Dr. Erickson has been utilizing the Feldenkrais Method of body awareness training in his physical therapy practice for 35 years

Reprinted with permission from Lawrence Wm. Goldfarb, CFT, Ph.D.

Feldenkrais®, Feldenkrais Method®, Functional Integration®, and Awareness Through Movement® are registered service marks; and Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitioner® and Guild Certified Feldenkrais Teacher® are certification marks of The FELDENKRAIS GUILD of North America and many other Feldenkrais professional organizations around the world.


Larry Goldfarb, Ph.D. is a movement scientist, certified Feldenkrais trainer, pioneering educator and author.
A practitioner for over thirty years, Larry has taught ATM in a wide range of contexts including rehabilitation, the arts, education, and on-the-job injury prevention. Larry directs teacher trainings and post-graduate courses, as well as mentorship programs in North America, Europe, and Australia. Beyond the illuminating models he developed to articulate the method behind the Feldenkrais method, making it easy to understand, Larry is highly regarded for his warm and personal teaching style. He maintains a private practice based in Santa Cruz, California.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Doctor Examining Male Patient With Knee Pain

Restoring Movement and Mobility: The fitness professional’s role in total joint replacement care

According to the American Joint Replacement Registry, there are 860,000 total knee and hip replacements done in the United States per year. This number is projected to double in the next ten years. There are more knees than hips done per year and more females have these joint replacements than males.

According to Mike Carberry of Advanced Medical Integration, “Regenerative medicine is one of the most talked about subject healthcare has ever known; and for good reason. It could hold the solution to the puzzle of America’s failed healthcare system.”

This is wonderful news for the personal training industry. Insurance is paying for less and less, costing more while the number of consumers seeking optimal health is increasing. A perfect storm in the making!

A personal training certificate, however, is not enough to appropriately deal with the typical client with total joint needs. Specialization in anatomy, joint physiology, biomechanics and therapeutic exercise are necessary in order to adequately and appropriately manage total joint conditions. These skills and techniques in conjunction with medical communication skills will give physicians confidence to send these patients to the appropriately skilled personal trainer. Spending time with a physical therapist and surgeon specializing in these areas will go a long way in establishing confidence, trust and credibility in handling the client with total joint conditions.

Most individuals with true joint pain have some level of osteoarthritis. Approximately 27 million Americans suffer from degenerative joint disease (also known as degenerative arthritis or osteoarthritis). Degenerative joint disease is the most common chronic condition of the joints and occurs most often in knees, hips, lower back and neck, small joints of the fingers, and the bases of the thumb and big toe.

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis that causes a breakdown of joint cartilage, and it affects mostly middle-aged and older adults.

Although there is no cure for osteoarthritis, the good news is that it can be helped, and quality of life maintained by implementing and maintaining some simple changes in daily life. Regardless of the intervention, from routine steroid injections to platelet rich plasma/stem cell treatments to total joint replacement, here are a few areas where the personal trainer can intervene with great success.

Exercise

Exercise is key component of arthritis care, exercise strengthens the muscles, lessens joint pain and stiffness and improves overall health. Types of recommended exercises may include strengthening, aerobic activity (aquatic activity is wonderful), range of motion or stretching activities and balance exercises.

Joint protection

Protect the joints to ease pain and avoid further damage. Make sure to balance rest with activity as well as know when to stop. A good rule of thumb is to adjust down the frequency, intensity and duration by 50% of what a “normal” client can do or what the client thinks they can do. Remember these clients are typically deconditioned relative to strength and cardiovascular fitness. They will not handle the all-too-popular high-intensity interval training (HIIT). This population will succumb to overload and may be injured.

Pain control

Pain control routinely treated with prescription or over-the-counter medications can be replaced or augmented by relaxation techniques (yoga, Tai Chi, meditation and massage) along with application of heat, cold and/or vibration.

Post-procedure care

If the client has had regenerative therapy or a total joint replacement, they will need a specific post-procedure plan to allow for healing/protection, early intervention and return to activity function. Hopefully, they had pre-intervention care inclusive of appropriate exercise, nutritional counseling and insight on what to expect with the procedure and post-procedure care. Appropriate nutrition for optimal health and healing along with hydration techniques and insights are a must during these sessions.

Phase 1: Post-procedure care

Typical post-procedure care is in three to four phases. Phase one is protect/rest, restore and control pain. During this phase the focus is on mediating pain, restoring range of motion, controlling swelling and protecting the joint. This is typically fourteen to twenty-one days in duration. Stitches or staples are usually removed at this time and scar management can commence around the twenty-first day.

Phase 2: Post-procedure care

Phase two is the restore and regenerate phase. The

wound is healing (healed), the joint and soft tissue healing continues, and remodeling of tissue has begun. This phase is typically three to six weeks in duration. Techniques to restore range of motion and other soft tissue techniques to facilitate healing according to tissue physiology and the client’s general health are initiated (conditions such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease and others will alter the healing and remediation phases). Techniques for ambulation, gait and balance are initiated along with appropriate cardiovascular conditioning.

Phase 3: Post-procedure care

Phase three typically commences when the client has gained full range of motion, has good balance and gait mechanics and is able to tolerate closed-chain activities for both upper and lower extremity movement patterns. This phase is the final phase and progresses to full functional activity and return to sport or recreational activities of choice (these activities may be placed into a fourth phase). During this phase it is incumbent upon the personal trainer to load appropriately and have working knowledge of the mechanics of the sport or recreational activity. There are some tremendous resources available for this purpose.

Complications

Complications to be aware of when working with these patients include but are not limited to infection, blood loss, dislocation, blood clots and fatigue. The personal trainer should also be in contact with the client’s physician and physical therapist if one has been engaged. These are medical conditions requiring communication and conservative care.

Most physicians like to know who is working with their patients and appreciate the communication for optimal outcomes. The insightful and knowledgeable personal trainer with the right training can be an invaluable member of the total joint care team. The future is bright!

This information is provided as an overview and in no way should be interpreted as a protocol for treatment or otherwise. Our goal is to inform the reader on opportunities in the profession and stimulate further investigation.

This article was featured in MedFit Professional Magazine fall 2019 issue.

Subscribe to MedFit Professional Magazine to read more great content like this!


Dr. Stephen A. Black is a sports medicine specialist, author and clinician. His doctoral degree is in sports medicine and he holds degrees in physical therapy, athletic training and certification through the National Strength and Conditioning Association. Dr. Black has over forty years’ experience in patient care and practice management. He lectures frequently on topics in sports medicine, works with professional, Olympic and youth athletes and holds several academic appointments. Visit his website, rockymountainhpc.com

Prescription for good health diet and exercise flat lay overhead with copyspace.

A New Era Begins

The rallying cry is, “Let’s change healthcare!” From all corners of the medical universe, there is agreement that change is necessary. The biggest questions are, “What is the change?” and, “Who will make it happen?”