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woman-reading-and-writing

GETTING TO “YES!”: Marketing Strategies to Help People Invest in Their Health

Bill walked into my client’s fitness studio clutching two things: a book and a small piece of paper.

With a sheepish look, he revealed, “My doctor gave me your book and this script to contact you. That was almost a year ago, and I haven’t gotten it done. Until now.”

After discussing his fitness goals and health concerns, Bill pulled out a pen and inked a check for a full year of private training.

It took months to get him in the door … and just 15 minutes to close the sale.

What happened?

The Long Game

Good marketing is about helping people invest in something they’ll be glad they did. If you are selling a $40 product, the sale is relatively easy. But when you’re offering a lifestyle change, complex emotions are involved.

Bill delayed, but when he was ready, he knew exactly where to go and what to do. My client understood marketing for the long game.

Since our ideal prospects often encounter our message before they’re ready to buy, marketing for the long game focuses on two key strategies:

  • Helping prospects make a decision sooner.
  • Ensuring they choose you.

Inspire: Lead with Story

One of the most powerful devices in your marketing toolkit should be storytelling.

Specifically, storytelling that creates the emotions you want your prospects to feel and associate with your offer: joy, hope, urgency, victory, etc.

It’s these emotions that drive our powerful unconscious mind to make conscious decisions that make us feel good.

What goes into a good inspiring story?

My two favorite books on this topic are Michael Hauge’s Storytelling Made Easy and Donald Miller’s Building a StoryBrand.

The most critical elements shared in these books come down to four key points:

  1. Show your character is a normal person.
  2. Share the crisis that changed their thinking.
  3. Describe their journey with you as their guide.
  4. Show the reward of their victory.

Even a short 5-sentence testimonial can cover all four of these elements and drive your prospects’ desire to get started.

The more you share stories, the more you can inspire your audience with emotions they will associate with your brand for the long-term.

Encourage: Build Their Confidence

As a publisher, I encounter a lot of business authors who are anxious to write a 200-page book filled with overwhelming details.

Features and facts great for a small portion of the population, but the vast majority of buyers get overwhelmed by analysis paralysis and walk away “to think about it for a little longer”.

Good marketing is educating your prospect to the point they’ve got the confidence to begin your process… but not so much that they gain a false confidence they should be able to do a version of it on their own.

If you truly believe your services offer value they can’t achieve without you, then make sure your marketing doesn’t imply they should try.

Build their confidence in the benefits of your proven process, not the details or the data.

Equip: Help Them Start Simple

Overwhelmed people don’t buy, and confused people don’t start so if you want to make getting started easier, make it simple.

My team and I have been doing this for years within the fitness industry, using 100-page books explicitly designed to convert prospects into clients.

The books are lead magnets, turning the authors into fitness authorities and local celebrities.

They educate without overwhelming; giving readers an idea of who they’ll meet at the studio, what to wear, what to take with them, what to eat (or not eat), and what to expect in their workout sessions (and why). Vital details that can close a sale faster.

Now, think about your company.

Remove the fear-of-the-unknown obstacle by showing potential customers exactly what to expect in their first few visits.

If you’re marketing online, demonstrate – screen by screen – the buying and login process before they click the “buy now” button.

When you clarify exactly what to expect and what to do first, you make the process easier.

And that matters.

Take the Lead

When you understand that marketing is a long game, it transforms your marketing strategy.

Spend time developing assets that stand the test of time; particularly those you can build once and reuse over and over.

An inspirational talk (or webinar), a compelling book, and a thoughtful email onboarding campaign are all reusable assets that give you time to inspire, encourage, and equip people to say yes to life-changing decisions.


Nicole Gebhardt loves marketing, books, and key lime pie. She is the CEO of Niche Pressworks, a consulting and publishing services company for experts, speakers, coaches, consultants, and business leaders. Learn more about her 3-book strategies inside “The Ultimate Book Plan” at NichePressworks.com

Female-Trainer-and-older-male-client

Patients Need Personal Trainers: How personal training can impact millions

In the United States, 11.2 million people were diagnosed with obesity and/or diabetes over the last year.(1,5) These are primary risk factors leading to stroke and total joint replacements, adding another 8 million people per year.(6,7) This means that the fitness professional in the post-medical and post-rehabilitation space has more potential clients than they could hope to serve. The question is how to reach them and build a business around these problems.

Personal Trainer and marketer Joe Lemon has some advice.  Two primary problems for trainers trying to innovate this post medical/rehabilitation space are trust and visibility. Both these problems are interrelated and so deserve to be tackled for this space to become profitable.

In the United States, less than 50% of physicians suggest patients go to a gym. Even less (20%) recommend a personal trainer.(4) But the question is, why? First, we found a general ignorance of what personal trainers can do for their clients and, secondarily, if personal training was a safe, effective modality. This is partially due to a lack of standardization in personal training education and regulation across the USA. In addition, until recently, there has been a lack of specific training for fitness professionals in the medical fitness space that can be understood and trusted.

Even for those exceptional personal trainers who do provide the training to address specific clients’ post-medical/rehabilitation needs, there is a gap between their skills and clinicians’ knowledge that they exist. Joe has practical advice to close that gap and create a bridge to clinicians.

First, identify who these clinicians are. Sports medicine, orthopedic surgeons, neurologists, bariatric doctors and primary care physicians are all viable referral sources. Network and get to know someone who can make personal introductions for you directly to the doctor or their assistant or office manager, who is often the gatekeeper of the practice. Once you get the opportunity to talk to them, give them tangible, always take a pamphlet explaining your qualifications, education, and process. Providing them with hard copy printouts from the MedFit websites (medfitnetwork.org and medfitclassroom.org) are the most accessible sources of information you could use. And always, leave them with the material they can give their patients that link directly back to you in the form of business cards and pamphlets/brochures.

Lastly, get out and talk about what you do. Remember, communication is 7% what you say where 38% how you speak it, and 55% your body language.(3) Getting in front of people these days is easier now than ever. Schedule talks at gyms and coffeehouses, video it, and post it online. The more you talk passionately about what you love doing, the better. Connect with your potential client recruit them to be your spokesperson to their physician for you.


Dr. Grove Higgins is a chiropractor, rehabilitationist, soft tissue injury expert, researcher, anatomy instructor, biomechanist, human performance expert, speaker, and corporate health consultant. In 2015, Dr. Higgins cofounded Neuroathlete with Coach Patrick Marques (LTC, US Army Ret.) and Peter Hoversten. Neuroathlete’s goal is to more broadly deliver neurological training to a global audience.

 

References

  1. (CDC), U. D. (2021). 2020, National Diabetes Statistics Report. 
  2. Lemon, J. (2021). Business Development, Market Research, & Strategic Partnerships. (G. Higgins, Interviewer)
  3. Michail, J. (2020, 8 24). Strong Nonverbal Skills Matter Now More Than Ever In The “New Normal”. Retrieved from Forbes: https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2020/08/24/strong-nonverbal-skills-matter-now-more-than-ever-in-this-new-normal
  4. Pojednic, R., Bantham, A., Arnstein, F., Kennedy, M., & Phillips, E. (2018). Bridging the gap between clinicians and fitness professional: a challeng to implimenting exercise as medicine. BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, 1-5.
  5. CDC f. (2021, 3 1). National Center for Health Statistics. Retrieved from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus/contents2019.htm#Table-021
  6. Springer, B. D. (2021). Highlights of the 2020 American Joint Replacement Registry Annual Report. Arthroplasty Today, 9, 141-142.
  7. Stroke. (2021, 5 25). Retrieved from Center for Disease Control and Prevention: https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/facts.htm
Fibromyalgia signs

Fibromyalgia and Exercise

According to the National Institute on Health (NIH), fibromyalgia affects over 5 million U.S. adults and an estimated 3-6% of the world population. While fibromyalgia is most prevalent in women (75-90% of those with fibromyalgia), it also occurs in men and children of all ethnic groups. People with fibromyalgia experience aches and pain all over the body, fatigue (extreme tiredness that does not get better with sleep or rest), and problems sleeping.

Fibromyalgia may be caused by a problem in the brain with nerves and pain signals. In other words, in people with fibromyalgia, the brain misunderstands everyday pain and other sensory experiences, making the person more sensitive to pressure, temperature (hot or cold), bright lights, and noise compared to people who do not have fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia has been compared to arthritis. Like arthritis, fibromyalgia causes pain and fatigue. But, unlike arthritis, fibromyalgia does not cause redness and swelling, or damage to the joints.

Diagnosis and Causes of Fibromyalgia

Up until recently, fibromyalgia has been very difficult to diagnose coining the condition as the “invisible disease” believing that the syndrome was “all in the head” of those who suffer from fibromyalgia. However, currently fibromyalgia can be identified through a questionnaire and the Manual Tender Point Survey test. There has been a breakthrough recently with a blood test that may identify fibromyalgia making it even more possible to treat fibromyalgia. However, more testing is needed to be more widely accepted. Here is a short list of what may cause fibromyalgia:

  • Genes: Mutation or deficiency in the MTHFR or COMT genes specifically
  • Having other diseases such as arthritis
  • Family history
  • Emotional or physical abuse
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Gender:  Occurs mostly in women
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Not moving enough

Exercise and Fibromyalgia

Moderate exercise is known to improve use of oxygen, energy levels, anxiety, stress and depression, sleep, self-esteem, cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, and mobility. While the pain and fatigue associated with fibromyalgia may make exercise and daily activities difficult, it is crucial to be physically active. Usually, there are no specific exercises to avoid if one has fibromyalgia. Aerobic exercise (running, jogging), weight training, water exercise, and flexibility exercises may all help.

Golf, tennis, hiking, and other recreational activities are also healthful. However, exercising hard (overexertion) leads to the problems people experience post-exercise, which are called “post-exertional malaise.” This occurs because people with fibromyalgia don’t have the energy to condition like others who can handle the increase in exercise and conditioning. Instead, if the exercise uses more than the limited amount of energy the body can make, their systems crash, and they feel like they were hit by a truck for a few days after. Because of this, the key is to find an amount of walking or other low-intensity exercises one can do, where he/she feels “good tired” after, and better the next day. Instead of ramping up in the length or intensity of the workouts, one should stick to the same amount while working to increase energy production.

Benefits of Exercise

Because the main focus of fibromyalgia is neurotransmitters and brain health, one key benefit of exercise is the boosting of endorphins and serotonin in the brain. Studies show that exercise can help restore the body’s neurochemical balance which in turn triggers a positive emotional state. Boosting levels of natural endorphins are essentially boosting pain-fighting molecules that help to reduce anxiety, stress, and depression which are symptoms of fibromyalgia. Elevating serotonin plays a vital role in mediating moods thereby helping relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia.

Other benefits of exercise include:

  • Burning calories and making weight control easier
  • Giving range-of-motion to painful muscles and joints
  • Improving a person’s outlook on life
  • Improving quality of sleep
  • Improving one’s sense of well-being
  • Increasing aerobic capacity
  • Improving cardiovascular health
  • Increasing energy
  • Strengthening bones
  • Strengthening muscles
  • Relieving pain

Join CarolAnn and Irene McCormick for a webinar on this topic, Tips for Fitness Professionals Training those with Fibromyalgia


CarolAnn (M.S., CPT, CN) is a 25+year fitness industry veteran holding positions such as program director, studio owner, educator, presenter, and author.  She develops health/fitness curriculum for organizations such as FiTOUR, Hydracize, MedFit Network, and PT Global.  Along with producing and starring in several fitness videos, she is an expert contributor for publications such as Livestrong, PFP, and New Tampa Style Magazine. She serves on the Health Advisory Board for MedFit Network.  She is now spreading the gospel of health and fitness targeting churches with Chiseled Faith®.  She has been selected to be a 2019-2021 National Fitness Hall of Fame Fitness Superstar.  You can find her work at CarolAnn.Fitness and ChiseledFaith.com.

vitamin-bottle

The (Current) Truth About Vitamin D

There are more health claims made about vitamin D than perhaps any other vitamin.  Media stories touting vitamin D for this ill or that are common, particularly in the age of COVID-19. We’re also frequently told Americans don’t get enough vitamin D, with surveys showing as many of 40% of individuals have below optimal amounts in the blood. So how do we get vitamin D and what claims are true and backed by research?  Let’s take a closer look at vitamin D to flesh out what we know for sure and where more research is needed. 

What is Vitamin D and How Do We Get It?

Molecularly, vitamin D is a group of fat-soluble compounds with a four ringed cholesterol backbone. What’s most important to know is that it comes in two forms — as vitamin D2 in food and as vitamin D3 in our skin.

Vitamin D3
Our skin is our primary source of vitamin D, but it begins there as an unorganized and inactive form, requiring UV exposure to convert to usable vitamin D3. Conversion via UV light is exceedingly efficient, and it’s estimated brief exposure of the arms and face is equivalent to ingesting 200 international units day. Conversion varies however with skin type (darker skin converts more), latitude, season and time of day. Infants, disabled persons and older adults often have inadequate sun exposure as well, and the skin of those older than 70 also does not convert vitamin D as effectively. Interestingly, vitamin D also requires temperature to be activated, so you may not get as much of a benefit from sunlight in the winter months as you might expect.  

Vitamin D2
Because it is fat-soluble, dietary vitamin D2 is best absorbed with fat in the diet and fish is a common source. Uptake can be negatively impacted by disorders associated with fat malabsorption such as celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, pancreatic insufficiency, cystic fibrosis, short gut syndrome and cholestatic liver disease.

Vitamin D in the Body: What We Know It Does

Once activated and in the bloodstream — either by UV exposure or absorption through the diet — the liver converts vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D), and then the kidneys further convert it to 1,25 hydroxyvitamin D, the most active form of vitamin D in the body. For this reason, kidney and/or liver problems can also negatively impact vitamin D levels.

Interestingly, all cells in our bodies have receptors for vitamin D, and this has in part fueled the varying claims as to how it might impact health. What we know for certain is that it helps with calcium absorption in the gut, regulating calcium levels via the kidneys, and regulating parathyroid hormone. Vitamin D’s role in calcium regulation and absorption means it has a direct impact on healthy bone growth and turnover. For this reason, you often see it in calcium supplements.

Research has also shown a clear correlation between Vitamin D and muscle health, including research showing improved lower body strength. Some research has also shown vitamin D can help prevent falls in the elderly.

Notable Areas Where the Jury is Still Out

  • Vitamin D has been thought to lower the risk of cancer, but currently, there is insufficient evidence to support this, though there are many ongoing studies.
  • There is also insufficient evidence showing that vitamin D helps improve autoimmune conditions and respiratory conditions such as asthma, COPD and acute viral respiratory diseases.  In a large study from the UK, no association was found between vitamin D levels and risk of mortality from COVID-19.
  • Although low vitamin D levels have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in some studies, there is no evidence that vitamin D supplementation improves cardiovascular outcomes.
  • Similarly, a growing number of trials examining the effects of vitamin D supplementation on pregnancy and birth outcomes show conflicting results, with some showing reduction in risk of low birth weight, but more data is needed.

Naomi L. Albertson M.D. is Board Certified by the American Academy of Family Physicians and specializes in the non-surgical management of musculoskeletal problems, sports injuries, concussions, and the treatment of osteopenia and osteoporosis.  A graduate of Tufts University School of Medicine, Dr. Albertson’s interest in bone health, exercise physiology and maximizing performance led her to develop Dr. Ni’s OC2, a bone health and muscle strength supplement for the unique frame support needs of adults over age 35. Visit her website, boneandmuscle.com.

Young woman having knee pain

Women Are More Susceptible To ACL Injuries: 5 Essential Exercises To Minimize The Risk

Women have different biomechanics due to a slightly wider pelvis, which means their knees buckle more easily when landing from a jump. Women have looser joints, which is a risk factor for knee problems, and muscular, strength and hormonal issues also play a part.

The ACL provides the knee joint with stability and rotational control during movement. When an ACL tear happens, hearing or feeling a ‘pop’ at the time of injury is common. This is followed by localized swelling at the knee joint.

An ACL injury can occur in several ways:

  • Rapid change of direction
  • Sudden stop
  • Sudden deceleration while running
  • Landing incorrectly after a jump
  • Hyperextension of the knee
  • Direct contact or collision while playing a sport

If you experience any sharp or sudden pain at the knee, especially during sports or from a fall, follow the First Aid RICE protocol immediately — Rest, Ice, Compress, Elevate — and seek medical attention immediately.

There isn’t much you can do once the injury happens, but there are ways to minimize the chance of it happening in the first place. Prevention is better than cure so focus on strengthening the kinetic chain and muscles around the knee. If you do lots of sport with plyometric movements, ensure your technique and form is correct, and include agility drills for neuromuscular control.

Here are 5 essential exercises to help stabilize and strengthen your knees, hips and glutes, which in turn will help prevent an ACL injury.

Single Leg Deadlift

Ensure that your knee doesn’t buckle and aim to keep your hips level. Keep your spine neutral and braced throughout the entire movement while maintaining balance.

Elevated Hip Raise

This exercise targets the hamstrings and calves. Maintain a neutral spine throughout the range of movements.

Walking Leg Lunges with Torso Rotation

Maintain an upright torso with your hips squared. If you feel a sharp pain in your knee at any time during this exercise, stop and seek advice from a qualified trainer.

Lateral Squats

Begin by placing your feet wide apart, then shift your weight from left to right while placing most of your body weight on the heels of your feet. If you feel a sharp pain in your knee at any time during this exercise, stop and seek advice from a qualified trainer.

 

Reprinted with permission from www.purelyb.com


Ke Wynn Lee is an author and an international award-winning corrective exercise specialist who currently owns and operates a private Medical Fitness Center in Penang. Apart from coaching, he also conducts workshops and actively contributes articles related to corrective exercise, fitness & health to online media and local magazines.

heart-illustration

Cholesterol and Heart Disease | Fact Sheet from PCRM

Nearly 2,400 Americans die of cardiovascular disease daily, with an average of one death occurring every 37 seconds. In 2018, roughly one out of every 10 Americans over the age of 20 had some type of cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease, heart failure, and/or stroke), and one out of every seven deaths in the United States was due to coronary heart disease alone.

pumpkins

Roasted Mini Pumpkins filled with Ice Cream

Roasted mini pumpkins make the perfect fall dessert vessel. The entire pumpkin is edible and packed with anti-aging phytonutrients. Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring “fountain of youth” and pumpkin seeds are one of the best sources. When you’re preparing your pumpkin bowls don’t forget to save the seeds for roasting.

Pumpkin Bowls

  • 4 mini pumpkins
  • 2 tbls coconut oil or vegan butter
  • 1 tbls coconut sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp pink salt
  • 2 drops of vanilla

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Fill roasting pan with ¼” water. Wash and dry pumpkins and shave a little off the bottom of each to create a stable base. Cut off top, clean out seeds and pulp. Pat the inside dry with paper towels. Warm oil, cinnamon, sugar and salt in a small saucepan. Remove from heat and add vanilla. Brush the prepared pumpkins inside and out with cinnamon mixture. Place pumpkins into water bath and top with lids. Roast until tender and caramelized. The aroma fills your home with holiday spirit.

Remove from pan and allow to rest for 5-7 minutes. Place each one onto a dessert plate and fill with your favorite ice cream. Dust with powdered sugar and cinnamon. I like a little orange zest, too.

Phyte Facts

Say hello to the real “fountain of youth” — hyaluronic acid (HA) is just that, says the latest research. Three nutrients have to be present for the body to assimilate and benefit from HA. Pumpkin has it all going on: Magnesium, Phytoestrogen, and the phytoflavanoid, Naringenin. Vitamin C and Zinc are big players here, too. HA affects every part of our bodies and super-agers have shown to have it in abundance. Pumpkin seeds are the number one source of quality HA in the seed world. Seeds contain a much higher source of HA than nuts.

The bright orange color shows us the presence of beta-carotene and supports the health of our skin, eyes and immune function. Beta-carotene becomes Vitamin A and Vitamin A becomes Abscisic Acid: a powerful cancer killer. That’s another thing our orange fruit and veggie friends do for us: they check the health of our cells and prevent mutation of cancer cells. The humble sweet potato has the best tracking system of all. Nature is so amazing!


Get more great recipes from Tina Martini — her book, Delicious Medicine: The Healing Power of Food is available to purchase on Amazon. More than a cookbook, combining 20+ years of experience, along with her love of coaching, cooking and teaching, Tina offers unexpected insights into the history and healing power of clean eating, along with recipes to help reduce your risk of disease and improve overall wellness so you can enjoy life!

Affectionately referred to as The Walking Encyclopedia of Human Wellness, Fitness Coach, Strength Competitor and Powerlifting pioneer, Tina “The Medicine Chef” Martini is an internationally recognized Naturopathic Chef and star of the cooking show, Tina’s Ageless Kitchen. Tina’s cooking and lifestyle show has reached millions of food and fitness lovers all over the globe. Over the last 30 years, Tina has assisted celebrities, gold-medal athletes and over-scheduled executives naturally achieve radiant health using The Pyramid of Power: balancing Healthy Nutrition and the healing power of food, with Active Fitness and Body Alignment techniques. Working with those who have late-stage cancer, advanced diabetes, cardiovascular and other illnesses, Tina’s clients are astounded at the ease and speed with which they are able to restore their radiant health. Tina believes that maintaining balance in our diet, physical activity, and in our work and spiritual life is the key to our good health, happiness and overall well being. Visit her website, themedicinechef.com